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Thousands in shelters as Hurricane hits Puerto Rico

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Thousands in shelters as Hurricane hits Puerto Rico

Thousands in shelters as Hurricane hits Puerto Rico

Thousands in shelters as Hurricane hits Puerto Rico

Thousands of Puerto Ricans heeded the calls of government officials and have taken refuge in shelters as the Caribbean island braces for Hurricane Maria’s direct hit early Wednesday.

“As of 2:30 a.m. we count 10,059 refugees and 189 pets (in shelters),” the island’s governor, Ricardo Rosselló, wrote in a tweet. On Tuesday, he called Maria an “unprecedented” atmospheric system.
The record-breaking Category 4 hurricane — with sustained winds of 155 mph (250 kph) –is the first storm of its strength to hit the US territory in nearly 80 years.
Conditions are expected to worsen between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. Wednesday, when the storm’s eye wall — and the strongest winds that it will bring with it — hits the eastern coast of the island.
As millions of the island’s residents hunkered down in their homes, others in the most vulnerable areas — the low-lying, flood-prone areas — have been evacuated.
The Puerto Rico Convention Center in San Juan — which is still housing Hurricane Irma evacuees from other Caribbean islands — is preparing to accept thousands of residents as the worst of the storm is felt.

Potentially ‘strongest ever’ storm

The storm is likely to be a record-breaking event, CNN meteorologist Derek Van Dam says.
“This could potentially be the strongest hurricane to ever reach the shores of Puerto Rico.
“A lot of people remember or have heard of the storms that hit in 1928 and 1930 — well guess what? This could pale those in comparison. The central pressure of this storm is at 908 millibars — that is the tenth lowest pressure recorded in Atlantic basin hurricanes.
“It will go down in the record books.”

hit from Hurricane Maria

Story highlights

  • Potentially strongest-ever storm to hit Puerto Rico barrels through Caribbean
  • Officials urged people to stay in homes or head to shelters

San Juan, Puerto Rico (CNN)Thousands of Puerto Ricans heeded the calls of government officials and have taken refuge in shelters as the Caribbean island braces for Hurricane Maria’s direct hit early Wednesday.

“As of 2:30 a.m. we count 10,059 refugees and 189 pets (in shelters),” the island’s governor, Ricardo Rosselló, wrote in a tweet. On Tuesday, he called Maria an “unprecedented” atmospheric system.
The record-breaking Category 4 hurricane — with sustained winds of 155 mph (250 kph) –is the first storm of its strength to hit the US territory in nearly 80 years.
Conditions are expected to worsen between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. Wednesday, when the storm’s eye wall — and the strongest winds that it will bring with it — hits the eastern coast of the island.
As millions of the island’s residents hunkered down in their homes, others in the most vulnerable areas — the low-lying, flood-prone areas — have been evacuated.
The Puerto Rico Convention Center in San Juan — which is still housing Hurricane Irma evacuees from other Caribbean islands — is preparing to accept thousands of residents as the worst of the storm is felt.

Potentially ‘strongest ever’ storm

The storm is likely to be a record-breaking event, CNN meteorologist Derek Van Dam says.
“This could potentially be the strongest hurricane to ever reach the shores of Puerto Rico.
“A lot of people remember or have heard of the storms that hit in 1928 and 1930 — well guess what? This could pale those in comparison. The central pressure of this storm is at 908 millibars — that is the tenth lowest pressure recorded in Atlantic basin hurricanes.
“It will go down in the record books.”
Storm surges of 6 to 9 feet are expected.
“Hurricane Maria is really scraping the upper echelon of what’s possible with hurricanes, (with) 175 mph sustained winds right around the center of the storm,” Van Dam said from San Juan, the island’s capital.
The island’s mountainous terrain will act like a barrier and squeeze out a lot of the moisture, he said, producing up to 2 feet of rain in some areas, which could lead to flash flooding — which Rosselló stressed was the number one cause of death following a storm of this nature.
Local politicians warned of the storm’s impact, but also stressed the importance of the islanders’ spirit.
“We are going to be hit hard,” San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz told CNN. “But we are blessed that we have what it takes to move and push on.
“We will make it, I bet you. I have no doubt, we’re going to make it.”

Stocking up

Residents in San Juan made sure to stock up ahead of the hurricane’s arrival. A sign on the shelves asked customers to limit buying to two cases of water, but the store had already run dry by the time A CNN team arrived. The store did still have food and other supplies.
At a gas station across the street from the store, the attendant said the station ran out of regular gas Tuesday morning and had since run out of premium gas.
Shoppers looking for essentials such as ice needed to wait for hours to buy the commodity, which will be used to keep perishables cool in power outages.
Rosselló told CNN’s “Anderson Cooper AC360˚” that the government has been “organizing” ahead of the storm.
“We can get people out of harms way, flooding regions, and make their way to safe shelters,” he said.
2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season Fast Facts

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